Tonbridge History

 

Tonbridge men who died in World War I:  S – Z

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S

 

 

John Salmons was born in 1899 at Tonbridge, the son of George and Mary. In 1911 the family lived at 129 Barden Road and John was at school. After leaving school he worked firstly for Mr G. Gunner, draper, and then for Messrs Stagg and Sons, fellmongers. He enlisted as soon as he was old enough and served as Rifleman 46408 2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade. He was killed in action on 25th April 1918 and is buried in Crouy British Cemetery, Crouy-sur-Somme.

 

 

William Edward Salmons was born in Tonbridge in 1897, the son of George and Mary and brother of John. Like his brother John he was at 129 Barden Road and a schoolboy at the time of the 1911 census. He served initially as Private 7626 1st Battalion Herefordshire Regiment which was a Territorial Regiment, and then subsequently as Private 267903 1st/1st Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment. He served overseas, but after 1916 and it is not known where. He died on 1st November 1919 and is buried in Tonbridge Cemetery.

 

Robert Sampson was born in 1891 at Beccles, Suffolk, the son of John and Ellen. In the 1911 census he was recorded as living with his family at Swines Green, Beccles and working as a printer’s compositor. Given his occupation he almost certainly moved to Tonbridge to work in the town’s extensive printing industry. He enlisted at Tonbridge early in the war and was recorded as serving in the Royal West Kents by the Tonbridge Free Press in December 1914 with an address given as 31 Lodge Road. He served as Private 1539 7th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment and first went to France on 26th July 1915. He died of wounds received in action a year later on 26th July 1916 and is buried at Boulogne Eastern Cemetery.

 

Frederick Sands was born in 1878 at Tonbridge the son of Thomas and Charlotte. He married Amelia Hannah Jeffery in 1901 at Tonbridge and by 1911 the couple with their three children were living at 3 Church Row and Frederick was working as a cabman-jobmaster. He served as Private G/16539 6th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment and was killed in action on 17th July 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.
 

Henry William Savage was born in Tonbridge in 1891, the son of James and Elizabeth. In 1901 the family lived at 62 St Mary’s Road. James was then an Inspector in the Tonbridge Police and Henry was at school. After leaving school Henry worked as a jeweller and in 1911 he was boarding at 2 Guilford Road, Tunbridge Wells. He joined the West Kent Yeomanry and saw service at Gallipoli and the Gaza Front. He subsequently transferred to the Royal Air Force, training at Cairo and then serving in France. He was a Lieutenant in the 21st Squadron RAF when, on returning from patrol on 14th August 1918, his plane was in collision with a balloon cable and he and his observer were killed in the resulting crash. He is buried at Lapugnoy Military Cemetery.

 

Frederick Sawyer was born in Burwash, Sussex in 1896, the son of William and Jane. By the time of the 1911 census the family were living at 98 Sylvan Villa, Barden Road and Frederick was working in a smelting works. Frederick enlisted as a Territorial soldier, Private TF/915 with the 1st/1st Kent Cycle Battalion and later as Private 265272 Royal West Kent Regiment. He saw service in India and died there on 22nd January 1917. He is buried at Rawalpindi War Cemetery.

 

Albert Edward Scott was born in Paddock Wood in 1898, the son of John and Emily Scott. In 1911 the family lived at 22 Hawden Road and Albert Edward was attending a local school. He enlisted at Tonbridge, probably in 1916, and served as Rifleman 46338 1st Battalion Rifle Brigade. He was killed in action on 1st November 1918 and is buried at Preseau Communal Cemetery Extension.

 

J. Scott: nothing known about this man.

 

William Henry Seale was born in Tonbridge in 1891, the son of William and Ann. In 1901 the family lived at 2 Peach Hall and William was a pupil at Slade School. By the time of the 1911 census William had already enlisted in the 1st Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment and was stationed at the Quebec Barracks, Bordon, Hampshire. In 1915 he married Bridget Dorgan at Tonbridge. He first went to France on 15th August 1914. He was a good soldier and had been promoted to the rank of Sergeant by 1917. He then obtained a commission in the 2nd Battalion Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry. He was attached to the 5th Trench Mortar Battery. In 1918 he won the Military Cross for valour in the field. He was home on leave between 19th February and 6th March 1918, and on returning to France was immediately back in action. He was severely wounded in action on the 8th March and subsequently died of his wounds on the 14th March 1918. He is buried at Rocquigny-Equancourt Road British Cemetery.

 

William Ernest Sellens was born in Marden in1885, the son of Walter and Caroline. In 1901 he was living with his brothers and sister at 65 The Drive, Tonbridge. He was working as an errand boy in a boot shop. By the time of the 1911 census he was living with his older brother Frederick and his wife at 7 Woodside Road, and working as a shop assistant. He married Edith Robinson in January 1914 at Tonbridge and then he and his wife Edith left the UK for Australia on 30th January 1914; his listed occupation then was farm labourer. He enlisted as Private 3946 22nd Battalion Australian Infantry AIF on 5th July 1915 at Melbourne, landing at Marseilles on 28th March 1916. He was killed in action at Pozieres on 5th August 1916. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial.

 

Edward Victor Sellings was born in Penshurst in 1899, the son of Edward and Rose May. After leaving school Edward worked for the South East & Central Railway as office boy at Staplehurst Station, later promoted to head clerk at Headcorn Station. His family were living at 3 Rita Cottages, London Road by 1918. Edward enlisted on 4th June 1917 and served initially as Private 77680 Durham Light Infantry and then subsequently as Private 31201 1st/5th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment. He went to France on 13th January 1918 and was killed in action on 25th March 1918. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

 

 

Anthony A Simpson [sic]: Anthony Henry Simpson was born in Rugby in 1888, the son of James Herbert and Charlotte Simpson. After leaving Corpus Christi College, Oxford in 1911 he took a position as an assistant master at Tonbridge School, where he was also an officer in the O.T.C. He was gazetted Lieutenant to the Special Reserve Royal Warwickshire Regiment on 24th December 1914. He went to France on 19th January 1915 where he contracted bronchitis on active service and died at the Base Hospital, Boulogne on 1st February 1915. He is buried at Boulogne Eastern Cemetery.

 

Alfred John Sinden was born in Capel in 1896, the son of Harry and Fanny. The family lived in the Tonbridge area. In 1901 they were at Five Oak Green and in 1911 at Brenchley. Alfred John, known as “Jack,” enlisted in the Royal Navy as a stoker [Chatham SS115048] on 20th October 1913. From 1st April 1914 he served on HMS Vanguard, being promoted from Stoker Class II to Stoker class I on 20th October 1914. His brother Charles Sinden also served in the Royal Navy as a Stoker and the brothers joined the Vanguard on the same day. They both died when HMS Vanguard was sunk on 9th July 1917.


Henry Charles Sinden (This maybe the CB Sinden remembered on the wall.) He was born in Tonbridge 1893, son of Harry and Frances Sinden and older brother of Alfred John Sinden. Charles, as he was known, lived with his parents at Buich yard, 2 Drayton Road, Lavender Hill, and worked as a farm labourer. He joined the Royal Navy the same day as his brother (known as John) and they were posted to HMS Vanguard. Due to an accidental explosion on 9th July 1917 at Scapa Flow the ship sank, killing an estimated 843 men including the Sinden brothers. He is remembered on the Chatham Naval Memorial.


Edward Treloar Smart was born in Bath in 1898, the son of the Revd John and Marian. By 1911 the family were living at 20 Manor Grove, Tonbridge. The Rev. John Smart was an assistant master at Tonbridge School where Edward was enrolled as a pupil. Edward served in the Royal Garrison Artillery initially, but later held a commission as Lieutenant in the Royal Flying Corps serving with the 2nd Squadron. He was posted missing, presumed killed in aerial action on 27th March 1918. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

 

J. Smarten: nothing is known of this man; there is no record of any man named Smarten having lost his life in the Great War.  

 

Arthur William Smith was born in Tonbridge in 1898, the son of Alfred and Ada. In 1911 the family lived at 81 High Street, Alfred was a barber and tobacconist and had his shop there, Arthur was a schoolboy. Arthur enlisted in the Kent Fortress Royal Engineers in November 1914 when he was sixteen years of age. He was stationed at Gillingham when early in 1915 he suffered an attack of appendicitis. Whilst recovering, but still in a weakened state, he contracted a cold which developed into pneumonia. He died on Tuesday 16th March 1915, just seventeen years old, and was buried with military honours at Tonbridge on Monday 22nd March 1915. He is almost certainly the youngest man named on the memorial.

 

Ernest Smith [as listed by the Tonbridge Free Press]: There were two men named Ernest Smith who had links with Tonbridge, the first being Private Ernest Smith L/9598 Royal West Kent Regiment whose family lived at Pembury Grove and who was reported as missing in France in the Tonbridge Free Press of 15th June 1917. However this man has a medal card with no notation of death and there is no CWGC entry for him. The other, more likely candidate, is Private Ernest Smith 200923 1st Battalion East Surrey Regiment who was killed in action on 20th October 1918. This man was born in 1898 at Chelsea the son of William and Anne Smith. By the time of the 1911 census Anne was a widow living at 586 King’s Road, Fulham, with Ernest and his half-sister Florence Hudson. Ernest was a schoolboy. It is thought that he was the Ernest Smith who married Edith Mortimer in 1917 at Tonbridge and who lived at 1 George Street in 1918. Ernest is reported to have enlisted in 1914, when he would have been too young for overseas service, and went to France in April 1918. He is buried at Bethencourt Communal Cemetery.

 

Frederick Smith is thought to have been born in Tonbridge in 1895, though he and his family have not been found in either the 1901 nor 1911 census returns for the town. He served as Private Frederick Smith G/11941 8th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment who was killed in action on 1st September 1916. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial. His parents are recorded as Mr F. and Mrs E. Smith of 2 Pembury Grove, Tonbridge. He was recorded as having been born and as having enlisted in Tonbridge.

 

William Ernest Smith was born in Tonbridge in 1886, the son of Alfred and Eliza. In 1901 the family lived at 16 Rose Street and William was employed as a paper boy. In 1911 the family lived at 60 Priory Road and William was employed as a butcher. He married Florence Louisa Leveridge on 3rd July 1915 at the Parish Church. He served as Private 1739 in the West Kent Yeomanry and then as Private 270833 in 10th Battalion The Buffs. He originally enlisted in the Yeomanry in March 1914; in September 1915 he went out to Gallipoli, arriving there on 24th September 1915. He then went to Egypt and then to France, where he was seriously wounded in September 1918 and was sent back to England to Sheffield Hospital for treatment. He was later transferred to Fort Pitt, Chatham and then Rusthall VAD Hospital where he died of his injuries on 10th June 1919. He is buried in Tonbridge Cemetery.

 

John Smitherman was born in Tonbridge in 1886, the son of William and Emily. In 1901 the family lived at 97 Priory Road and John was employed as an errand boy for a leather merchant. By 1911 John had left home and was working as a barman at the Melbourne Hotel in Wallington. He enlisted at Tonbridge and served as Private G/44043 17th Battalion Middlesex Regiment. He was killed in action on 13th November 1916. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

 

A. Stacey: nothing known about this man.

 

Brian John Stacey was born in South Kensington, London in 1894, the son of William and Florence. In 1907 Brian became a day boy at Tonbridge School living with his sisters at Fairview, London Road; his father had died by that date and his mother was living elsewhere. Brian enlisted in the East Kent Yeomanry, but was commissioned as 2nd Lieutenant in the 7th Battalion Loyal North Lancashire Regiment before transferring to the Royal Field Artillery serving with “B” Battery, 63rd Brigade. He died of wounds received in action on 26th April 1917 and is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery.

 

 

George Samuel Standen was born in Tonbridge in 1885, the son of Samuel and Annie. In 1901 he and his brother, John Richard (see next entry) were living with the rest of the family at 78 Priory Road and George was employed as a grocer’s assistant. By 1911 he had left home and was working, still as a grocer’s assistant, in Chorlton-on-Medlock, Manchester. In 1912 he married Ellen Elizabeth Cox at Chorlton. He served as Private 19465 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards and was killed in action on 11th September 1917. He is buried at Artillery Wood Cemetery.

 

John Richard Standen, brother of George Samuel, was born in Tonbridge in 1888. He enlisted in the Royal West Kent Regiment at Tonbridge as a drummer L/8678 and by the time of the 1911 census he was stationed in India. From February 1915 his unit, the 2nd Battalion, was part of the Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force and he was wounded at the siege of Kut, and died from his wounds on 9th May 1916. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Basra Memorial.

 

Cecil Stevens was born in Tonbridge in 1890, the son of Stanley and Harriet. In 1911 the family were living at 35 Lodge Road and Cecil was working as a greengrocer. He served initially as Private 917 Royal West Kent Regiment, later as Rifleman B/200298 1st Battalion Rifle Brigade. He was killed in action on 11th October 1917 and is buried at Cement House Cemetery.

 

James Robert Stewart was born in Helensburgh, Dunbartonshire in 1885. In 1911 he was living with his brother Alexander and sister Sarah at 55 Hornsey Rise Gardens London N., and employed as a clerk for a paint manufacturer. He apparently had relatives and friends in Tonbridge and was a frequent visitor. He enlisted in August 1914 and served as Private 2250 14th Battalion London Regiment [London Scottish]. He went to France on 18th March 1915 and was seriously wounded by shell fire when coming out of the line on 14th May 1915. He was brought back to England, but died of his wounds on 20th May 1915. He is buried in Tonbridge Cemetery.

 

Luke Still M.M. was born in Gatton, Surrey in1898, the son of George and Emma May. In 1911 the family lived at Upper Haysden, Tonbridge and Luke was at school. After leaving school Luke worked for Mr E. Tindall at Bidborough. He enlisted initially as Private 6605 [later 225142] Essex Regiment. He was subsequently transferred to the Royal Fusiliers serving as Private 225339. He was wounded in action on 3rd April 1918, and it was at about that time he was awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous bravery [award gazetted on 29th August 1918]. He recovered and re-joined his unit. He was again wounded in action on 23rd September 1918 and admitted to the 1st South African Military Hospital where he later died of his wounds on 18th October 1918. He is buried at Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension.

 

Henry Bertram Stokoe was born in Tonbridge in 1893, the son of Henry and Annie Esther. The family lived in Park House, Dry Hill Road, Tonbridge from the early 1890s and Henry senior was a housemaster at Tonbridge School, where Henry junior was a pupil from 1908 until 1913. After leaving school Henry was an undergraduate at Oriel College, Oxford when war was declared. He obtained a commission in the 6th Battalion King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry and went out to France in May 1915. He was effectively in command of “A” Company of his Battalion following heavy losses in September 1915 and held the rank of [temporary] Captain. He was killed in action on 12th October 1915 at St Eloi, Flanders. He is buried at Elzenwalle Brasserie Cemetery.

 

Wesley Stone was born in Tonbridge in 1879, the son of George and Ellen. He married Edith Botten at Tonbridge on 26th February 1898 and in 1901 he and his wife and daughter were living at 28 Darwen Road and Wesley was working for himself as a gas and hot water engineer By the time of the 1911 census Wesley and his family were living at 90 Pembury Road and Wesley was working as a house painter. He enlisted at Tonbridge on 10th October 1914 for service with the Kent [Fortress] Royal Engineers as Sapper 1314. He saw service in several different parts of the country, but not overseas. He contracted cerebro-spinal meningitis in June 1915 and was immediately sent to Fort Pitt Hospital, Chatham. He was seriously ill for six weeks before he died of exhaustion on 23rd July 1915. He is buried in Tonbridge Cemetery.

 

Thomas Benjamin Walker Strood was born in Woolwich in 1895 the son of Frederick and Edith. The family moved to Tonbridge in about 1904 and in 1911 lived at 39 St Stephen’s Street. Frederick was employed as a cricket ball maker and Thomas as a general labourer. Thomas served as Private 6253 14th Battalion London Regiment [London Scottish]. He was killed in action on the opening day of the Somme offensive 1st July 1916. He was originally reported as missing, but on the night of 14th October 1916 his body was found by a patrol and the officer in charge wrote to his parents to report that their son’s body had been found. He is buried at Gommecourt British Cemetery No. 2, Hebuterne.

 

John Edward Sturt was born in Little Horsted, Sussex in 1894, the son of Edward and Ada. In 1911 the family lived at House Farm, Somer Hill, Tonbridge and John Edward was employed as a clothier’s apprentice. He enlisted initially as Private 3882 Royal West Kent Regiment and saw subsequent service as Lance-Corporal 633419 1st/20th Battalion London Regiment. He died of wounds received in action on 24th March 1918 and is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery.

 

T



Daniel Taylor
was born in Withyham, Sussex in 1887, the son of Caleb and Mercy. In 1911 Daniel was boarding at 3, Birchden Cottages, Groombridge near Tunbridge Wells and working as a nurseryman’s labourer. His father Caleb, who had remarried, was then living at 19 Priory Street, Tonbridge. Daniel served as Private G/654 6th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment. He first entered France on 1st June 1915. He died of wounds received in action on 4th October 1916 and is buried at Dartmoor Cemetery Becordel-Becourt.

 

Thomas Cedric Fawsitt Taylor was born in Sydney, New South Wales in 1898, the son of Arthur and Ethel. In 1911 the family were living at West Drayton. At some point after that Thomas emigrated to Canada and his father moved to Tonbridge. Thomas attested for service with the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force on 2nd March 1916 at Halifax Nova Scotia. He possibly lied about his age, giving his birth as 20th November 1897 when all other evidence points to a birth in 1898. He served as Private 471150 25th Battalion Canadian Infantry. He died on 29th September 1916 with his age recorded as 17; he has no known grave and is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial.

 

John Robert Thayer M.M. was born in Dorking in 1892, the son of Thomas and Mary. By 1901 the family were living at 16 Lavender Hill, Tonbridge. On 1st September 1909 John Robert Thayer attested for service as Driver 58508 in the Royal Field Artillery. In 1911 he was stationed at the RFA Barracks at Portsmouth. He was promoted to Corporal on 13th August 1914 and landed in France on the 22nd August 1914 with the 109 Battery. He subsequently served with the 85th Brigade and was promoted Sergeant on 23rd February 1915. He had a further promotion to Battery Quarter-Master Sergeant on 19th December 1916. He received the Military Medal for bravery in the field in January 1917, the award was published in the London Gazette on 26th April 1917. He was mentioned in dispatches on five separate occasions. He was wounded with a gunshot wound to his right eye on 27th July 1917. He returned to England on 5th August 1917 and was posted initially to 4a Reserve Brigade and then, on 28th November 1917 to 6a Reserve Brigade. He married Edith Lillian Delicate in the summer of 1917 at Tonbridge. He fell ill in September 1918 and died of pneumonia on 28th September 1918 at Cambridge Hospital, his wife was present at his death. He is buried in Tonbridge Cemetery.

 

Frederick Thompson was born in Folkestone in 1894, the son of Frederick and Elizabeth. When he attested for Territorial service in the Kent Cyclists on 30th November 1914 he gave his address at 24 Avebury Avenue, Tonbridge. His initial number was 1487, later renumbered in 1916 as 265676. He saw service in India with the Kent Cyclists and was appointed a Lance-Corporal on 13th June 1916. He contracted a fever in July 1917 and died on 31st July 1917 at Rawalpindi Hospital. He is buried at Rawalpindi War Cemetery.

 

James Thornton was born in Edinburgh in 1899, the son of John and Elizabeth. In 1911 the family were living at 12 Preston Road, Tonbridge and James was at school. After leaving school James worked for the South East & Central Railway in the Electrical Linesman Department. He attested for service with the 7th Reserve Battalion Middlesex Regiment at Tonbridge on 21st October 1916, a month before his 18th birthday. He was initially sent to the Army Reserve until he was old enough for active service. He was mobilised on 2nd July 1917 and went to France on 6th November 1917 where he served as Private 207989 21st Battalion Middlesex Regiment. He died of wounds received in action less than three weeks later on 24th November 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial.
 

Michael Topham was born in Bombay, India in 1895, the son of Francis and Pauline Topham. He attended Tonbridge School between 1908 and 1914 as a day boy. After leaving school he was a student at Downing College, Cambridge. He enlisted initially in the 19th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, reaching the rank of Sergeant 993 and seeing service in France from 14th November 1915. He subsequently obtained a commission, on 4th August 1916, as 2nd Lieutenant Royal Flying Corps. He was killed in aerial action over France on 13th April 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Flying Services Memorial.

 

William Turley was born in Tonbridge in 1886, the son of Luke and Ruth Turley. In 1909 he married Lottie Kate Stiff at Tonbridge and in 1911 the couple with their daughter were living at 59, Ordnance Road, Greenwich. William was working as a bricklayer’s labourer. His parents continued to live in Tonbridge, as did his wife when he was serving. William served with the Middlesex Regiment and first went to France on 27th July 1915. He was Sergeant G/5617 with the 12th Battalion when he was killed in action on 26th September 1916. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

 

Edward Turner was born in Tonbridge in 1893, the son of Edward and Lillie. His parents appear to have separated, and in 1911 he was living with his mother and siblings at 1 Kennings Row, Tonbridge and working as a market gardener. [His father appears to have lived in Houselands Road]. He left the UK for Canada on 21st November 1912 and settled in Ontario. He attested for service with the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force at London, Ontario on 19th November 1914. He stated that he had had 7 years previous military service with the 7th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment. He served as Gunner 84191 4th Brigade Canadian Field Artillery and died on 28th February 1916. He is buried at Maple Leaf Cemetery.

 

Thomas Frank Tutton was born in Tonbridge in 1891, the son of Thomas and Rosetta. Thomas attested for 6 years’ service in the Army Reserve [Special Reserve] with the 3rd Battalion Devonshire Regiment on 12th January 1910. He was already serving in the 4th Company Army Service Corps [TF] at that time. Later that same year he joined the regular army as Gunner 33630 Royal Garrison Artillery. In 1911 he was stationed in the West Indies, Bermuda & Jamaica, serving with 66 Company RGA. He went to France on 9th December 1914 after being promoted to Bombardier on 19th October 1914. He died of wounds sustained in action with the 5th Mountain Battery on 13th March 1915 and is buried at Estaires Communal Cemetery and Extension.

 

Jack Twort was born in Tonbridge in 1873, the son of Horace and Philadelphia. Jack joined the Royal Navy on 5th December 1892 as a Stoker 2nd Class and gradually worked his way up to the rank of Chief Stoker on HMS Tamer on 17th July 1912. He married Olive Winifred Couchman in 1904 at Sevenoaks. On 30th July 1914 Jack was transferred to the HMS Hogue and, in company with HMS Aboukir and HMS Cressy, was patrolling the North Sea on 22nd September 1914 when they encountered the German U-boat U9. U9 sank first HMS Aboukir and then HMS Hogue as she stopped to pick up survivors. Jack Twort and another Tonbridge man, Henry William Barling [HMS Aboukir] lost their lives. At the time of death his mother was living in Tonbridge.

 

U



Thomas Frederick Upton
was born in Tonbridge in 1884, the son of Thomas and Harriet. In 1911 he was living with his parents at 34 Norfolk Road and was working as a gunpowder maker. On the 6th June 1914 he attested for service with the Kent [Fortress] Royal Engineers; he had had previous Territorial Army service, time expired. He served as initially as Private 1118, later promoted to Corporal and re-numbered in 1916 as 540391. He first saw active service in the Gallipoli campaign from 7th October 1915 during which he appears to have suffered from two shrapnel wounds, one to his left ear and the other to his leg. He came back to England on 22nd May 1916, before returning to the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force in Palestine on 20th July 1916. He was on his way home on leave in October 1918 when he suffered a bout of malaria. His ship docked at Cherbourg on 2nd October and he was taken into hospital, where his condition worsened, pneumonia set in, and he died on 4th October 1918. He is buried in Tourlaville Communal Cemetery and Extension.
 

 V

 

Charles Cobden Vinall was born in Brighton in 1886, the son of Stephen and Eliza He joined the Royal Navy as an Ordinary Seaman on 27th May 1905 for 5 years active service and 7 years in the Reserve. He was duly transferred to the Reserve on 29th May 1910. In 1911 he was living with his parents at 54, Lincoln Street, Brighton and working as a labourer on the London, Brighton & South East Railway. Later in 1911 he married Lily Shoebridge at Tonbridge. He was recalled from the Reserve on 13th July 1914 and served on HMS Good Hope as an Able Seaman from 31st July 1914. On 1st November 1914 HMS Good Hope, as part of Admiral Craddock’s Squadron, encountered the German cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau off the coast of Chile. HMS Good Hope was sunk with the loss of all hands, some 900 men.  

 

Robert Saxelby Vine was born in Sheffield in 1891, the son of George Robert and Alice. He came to Tonbridge in September 1915 to take up a position on the staff of Judd Commercial School. At about the same time he married Elsie Palmer. He had poor eyesight and was refused three times by the army, before they finally took him in December 1915. He was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 1st Battalion Cambridgeshire Regiment. He went to France in August 1916 and was mortally wounded on 14th October 1916 and died on the same day. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.
 

W



Luther Waghorn
was born in Tonbridge in 1878, the son of James and Clara. The family were recorded as living at 117 Pembury Road, Tonbridge and in 1901 Luther James was working as a telegraphist but by 1911 he had changed jobs to become a platelayer. He enlisted at Tonbridge and served as Private 22811 1st Garrison Battalion, Essex Regiment. He died, possibly of fever or disease, at Mudros on the Greek Island of Lemnos, on 12th December 1915 and is buried at Portianos Military Cemetery. Mudros was an important supply and staging port for the Gallipoli campaign.

 

T. Wall (Edward Thomas) was born in Tonbridge in 1896, the son of Daniel and Eliza. In 1901 the family were recorded as living at 21 Uridge Road and in 1911 Edward Thomas was a pupil at the Xaverian Brothers School, Pennybridge, Mayfield, Sussex. His father, Daniel, was a Colour Sergeant in the army. Edward Thomas served as Rifleman 591141 [initially 3084] “D” Company 2nd/18th Battalion London Regiment [London Irish Rifles]. It is probable, given his original 4 figure number, that he was a Territorial soldier originally. He was killed in action on 9th October 1916. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.
 

Wallis [no initial]. William John James was born in Dartford in 1885, the son of William and Clara Wallis. In 1906 William Wallis married Clara Herbert at Strood and by 1911 the couple and their two children were living at 105 High Street, Tonbridge and he was working as the branch manager for a boot retailer. He enlisted at Tonbridge, probably around 1916, and served as Private G/21520 6th Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment. He died of wounds received in action on 18th October 1918 and is buried at Cambrin Military Cemetery.

 

J. Walters: possibly the same man as James Waters.

Alfred Leslie Ware was born in Tonbridge in 1897, the son of William and Jane. The family are recorded as living at 122 St Mary’s Road, in 1901 and number 170 in 1911. Alfred was a pupil at St Stephen’s School and joined the army as soon as he was 17 years old. He served as Gunner 77693 in the Royal Field Artillery. He first went to France in July 1915 and was wounded in November 1916. He recovered and continued to serve. After a spell at home on leave he returned to France on 10th February 1918 and was killed in action on 26th March 1918 whilst serving with “D” Battery, 161st Brigade. He is buried at Bac-Du-Sud British Cemetery, Bailleuval.   

 

L. Ware: believed to be the same man as Alfred Leslie Ware

 

Walter Edward Stanley Warnett was born in Leicester in 1894, the son of Frank and Edith. The family were living at Greenwich in 1901 then moved to Sevenoaks and were in Tonbridge at the end of the war. Walter enlisted in the Army Reserve - Special Reserve at Maidstone on 12th January 1911, subsequently transferring to the Royal West Kent Regiment on 21st August 1911. He was still a serving soldier when the war began; he was promoted from Corporal to Lance-Sergeant on the 7th August 1914 and entered France just over a week later on the 15th August 1914. He was killed in action on 19th September 1914 and is buried at Vauxbuin French National Cemetery.
 

Percy Waterman was born in Hadlow in 1890, the son of Frank and Anna. The family are recorded as living in St Mary’s Road, at number 140 in 1901 and number 60 in 1911. He served as Private L/10623 1st Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment, and, as he entered France on 22nd April 1915, he must have enlisted in the autumn of 1914. He was initially posted as missing, but later his death was presumed to have taken place on the 30th July 1916. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

 

James Waters: Theodore James was born in Tonbridge in 1896, the son of James and Eliza. In 1911 the family were recorded as living at 25 Waterloo Road and Theodore James worked as a parcel boy. When he enlisted on 11th October 1916 he was working as a gardener and lived at 1 Wincliffe Road, Tonbridge. He served as Private G/23096 Royal West Kent Regiment, doing his basic training with the 3rd Battalion, then posted to the 10th Battalion [“C” Company] when he went to France on 6th January 1917. He was killed in action on 7th June 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ypres [Menin Gate] Memorial.
 

Sidney James Watts was born in Balham, London in 1887, the son of Sidney and Eliza. The family moved to Tonbridge in the 1890s, when they lived at 31 St Mary’s Road. Sidney attended Judd Commercial School, leaving in 1901 for a job with Messrs Seale & Austen. He then worked for a firm of electrical engineers in London before emigrating to Canada in about 1910, where he continued to work as an electrician. He enlisted on 22nd September 1914 at Valcartier as Private 10077 3rd Battalion Canadian Infantry. He came to England in October 1914 and on to France in February 1915. He was initially reported as missing on 11th May 1915 and then reported as a prisoner of war in June 1915. Unfortunately that was not the case and it was later established that he had in fact been killed in action on 23rd April 1915. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ypres [Menin Gate] Memorial.
 

T. Watts: Nothing known about this man.

 

Henry John Weatherburn was born in Tonbridge in 1899, the son of Henry and May. The family are recorded as living at 17 Hectorage Road. After leaving school, Henry worked for Messrs Roland Stagg Ltd. As soon as he was 18, in 1917, he enlisted as Private 70276 7th Battalion Royal West Surrey Regiment. He went to France in March 1918 and was killed in action the following month, on 26th April 1918. He is buried in Hangard Wood British Cemetery.

 

William Webb was born in Nettlestead in 1868, but neither his birth registration, nor census entries have been found before 1891, when he was listed as a stoker on HMS Hotspur. William Webb joined the Royal Navy on a 12 year engagement as a stoker on 6th May 1890; he was duly discharged from HMS Acteon on 8th May 1912 to his pension. He was recalled or re-engaged on 2nd August 1914 as a Stoker Petty Officer. In August 1916 he was serving on HMS Lancaster. On 22nd August 1916, whilst ashore at Esquimalt, Canada, he was fatally injured in a road accident. He is buried in Esquimalt [Veterans] Cemetery. His married sister, Charlotte Holden, was a Tonbridge resident.

 

Frederick Webber was born in Tonbridge in 1892, the son of Francis and Emily. In 1911 the family were recorded as living at 11 Quarry Hill Road and Frederick was working in the civil service whilst also studying for his qualifications. Francis [Frank] Webber served on Tonbridge Council. Frederick enlisted in the Civil Service Rifles in June 1915. On the 24th November 1915 he married Ann Crawford Gow in Bermondsey. Frederick served in the UK as Lance-Corporal 4180 15th Battalion London Regiment and was then commissioned as 2nd Lieutenant in the Machine Gun Corps in October 1916. He went to France on 13th July 1917 and was killed in action with the 235th Company MGC on 30th November 1917. His wife gave birth to their only child, Joyce Hope Webber, on the day of his death – 30th November 1917

 

F. Welch. This man has not been positively identified, but is thought to be Frank Welch born in Canterbury in 1885, the son of William and Emily Welch. He served as Sergeant T/200014 1st Battalion The Buffs [East Kent Regiment] and died on 21st March 1918. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

 

James Hoste Welldon was born in Ceylon [Sri Lanka] in 1898, the son of Charles and Mary. Charles Welldon was a tea planter in Sri Lanka. By 1911 the family had returned to England and were living at 23 Granville Road, Hove. At the time of the war the family were living at Beech Lawn, Tonbridge. James was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 6th Battalion The Buffs [East Kent Regiment]. He was initially thought to be wounded and taken prisoner, but later given as having died of his wounds on 30th November 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louveral.

 

Arthur Whenday was born in Hadlow in 1878, the son of John and Sarah. In 1901 the family were recorded as living at 23 Hadlow Road and Arthur was working as a carpenter. In 1911 Arthur and his married sister Elizabeth were living at 40 Chichester Road and he was working as a corn chandler’s manager. On the 14th September 1914 Arthur attested as Private 3258 [subsequently 42334 & 19285] in the 4th Battalion [Territorial] Royal West Kent Regiment. He served initially in India from 29th October 1914 until 7th March 1916, when he returned to the UK and was transferred to the 2nd Battalion RWK. He then served in France from 13th January 1917, transferring Battalions again, this time to the 6th Battalion from 15th January 1917. He was initially posted missing, later confirmed as killed in action on 3rd May 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

 

Horace Wickenden was born in Tonbridge in 1886, the son of Thomas and Sarah. In 1901 the family lived at 8 Danvers Road and Horace was working as a painter’s apprentice with his father who was a painter and paper hanger. In 1907 Horace married Amy Emily Ray at Sevenoaks. Horace and his family have not been found in 1911. He enlisted at Tonbridge and served initially as Private G/130039 Royal Sussex Regiment, and later as Lance-Corporal G/40393 12th Battalion Middlesex Regiment. He died of wounds received in action on 7th December 1917 and is buried at Dozinghem Military Cemetery.

 

Sidney Wightwick was born in Tonbridge in 1889, the son of William and Minnie. In 1901 the family were recorded as living at London Road, Tonbridge and Sidney was still a schoolboy. By the time of the 1911 census Sidney had left home to work as a clerk for Messrs Spencer, Turner & Boldero Ltd., Drapers of Lisson Grove London; Sidney lived with twenty other clerks at the firm’s premises at 33 Balcombe Road NW London. Sidney attested for service with the Territorial Army, 9th Battalion County of London, on 16th February 1909. He was discharged as time expired on 15th February 1913. Shortly afterwards Sidney emigrated to Canada. He enlisted with the Canadian Forces on 6th November 1914 at Victoria, British Columbia as Private 77335 7th Battalion Canadian Infantry. He was subsequently commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 2nd/9th Battalion. He died of wounds received in action on 9th September 1917 and is buried at Divisional Collecting Post Cemetery and Extension. [See also Oswald Wightwick – “Lost Men”]
 

Hugh Wilding-Jones was born in Haywards Heath in 1896, the son of William and Ellen Maria Wilding-Jones. In 1911 the family were living at Gable House, Yardley Park Road, Tonbridge and Hugh was a student at Tonbridge School. After he left Tonbridge School he was an undergraduate at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, joining the Royal Welsh Fusiliers in 1916 as a 2nd Lieutenant. He was wounded in the Somme campaign of 1917. By 1818 he was a Lieutenant serving with 3rd Battalion, but attached to 11th Battalion RWF. He died on 22nd September 1918 of wounds received the previous day in the advance against Bulgarian troops at Salonica. He is buried at Mikra British Cemetery, Kalamaria.

 

George Wildish was born in Wouldham in 1878, the son of Isaac and Ann Eliza. George may have seen service first during the Second Boer War 1899 - 1902, serving as Private 4990, 19th Prince of Wales Own Hussars. In 1906 he married Minnie Lavinia Killick [sister of Herbert Arthur Killick] at Tonbridge. By the time of the 1911 census George and his family were living at 100 Grosvenor Road, Aldershot and he was working as an officer’s groom. He also appears to have pre-war service in the Royal Army Veterinary Corps as Private SE/1032. He was mobilised in August 1914 and served as Gunner 156167 Royal Field Artillery, entering France on 25th November 1914. He was serving with the 20th Division Ammunition Column when he died on 26th March 1917. He is buried at Grove Town Cemetery, Meaulte. Minnie Lavinia had returned to live in Tonbridge at 113 Vale Road.

 

Stanley Walter Willden was born in Derby in 1896, the son of Walter Henry and Elizabeth Jane. Walter Henry Willden died in 1899 and by the time of the 1901 census Elizabeth Jane and her son Stanley Walter were living at 2, George Villas, Romford. In 1905 Elizabeth Jane married her brother-in-law, Herbert Willden, who, like Walter Henry, was a draper. By the time of the 1911 census the family were living at 2 Woodfield Road, Tonbridge and Stanley was a student at Judd School. In October 1914 Stanley enlisted as Private TF/3499 Royal West Kent Regiment and went to Gallipoli in July 1915. He was wounded and also suffered from enteric fever. He returned to England to recover, then re-joined his Regiment serving with “B” Company 10th Battalion RWK. He was re-numbered as Private 210076 in 1916/7. He was initially posted as missing in action, later confirmed as having been killed in action on 31st July 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ypres [Menin Gate] Memorial.

 

Charles Williams was born in Tonbridge in 1883, the son of Charles and Sophia. In 1911 the family were recorded as living at 30 Albert Road, Tonbridge and Charles was working as a stableman. He served as Driver 5561 14th Brigade Royal Horse Artillery. He had pre-war service and would have been recalled to the colours on the outbreak of war. He went to France on 5th October 1914 and served there until his discharge on 21st August 1916. He was discharged in poor health and subsequently died on 19th February 1917. He is buried in Tonbridge Cemetery.

 

Robert Wilmshurst was born in Goudhurst in 1892, the son of John and Mary and younger brother of William Sivyer Wilmshurst. By the time of the 1901 census the family were living at Donald Villas, London Road, Hildenborough and Robert was attending a local school. In 1911 the family were at 15, Garden Road, Tonbridge and Robert was then working as a labourer in a timber yard. In 1914 he married Eliza J. E. Burr at Tonbridge. He served as Private 52701 32nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers and was killed in action on 27th June 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ypres [Menin Gate] Memorial.

 

William Wilmshurst was born in Horsmonden in 1884, the son of John and Mary (older brother of Robert Wilmshurst). By the time of the 1901 census the family were living at Donald Villas, London Road, Hildenborough and William was working as a farm labourer. In 1911 the family were at 15 Garden Road, Tonbridge and William was then working as a jobbing gardener. He later worked as a gardener in the employ of Mr Reeves of Postern Heath. In 1915 he married Alice Payne at Tonbridge and the couple lived at 20 Lavender Hill. In June 1916 he enlisted as Private 31789, Suffolk Regiment. He was later transferred and served as Private 203965 1st Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment. He was killed in action on 23rd August 1918 and is buried at Adanac Military Cemetery, Miraumont.  

 

James Woodason was born in Tonbridge in 1887, the son of James and Elizabeth. In 1911 he was recorded as living at 11 Rose Street, Tonbridge and working as a cellar man for a caterer. In the spring of 1914 he married Ethel May Best at Tonbridge. He enlisted on 9th October 1916 and did his initial training at Scarborough with the 1/1 Huntingdon Cyclists as Private 29183. In July of 1917 he was transferred to the Bedfordshire Regiment and went to France on 1st August 1917. He was subsequently again transferred and served as Private 295308 2nd/4th Battalion, London Regiment [Royal Fusiliers]. He was killed in action on 20th September 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ypres [Menin Gate] Memorial.

 

Albert Woolley was born in Tonbridge in 1893, the son of William and Clara. In 1911 he was recorded as living at 1 Alexandra Road, Tonbridge and working as a clerk for Mr Freeland of Quarry Hill, an agricultural merchant. He enlisted at Tonbridge in 1915 initially as Private 24414 5th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, and went to France in June 1916. He was wounded at High Wood on 16th September and sent home to recover. He was later transferred and served as Lance Corporal 68210 22nd Battalion London Regiment. He was killed in action at Peronne, whilst acting as platoon commander, on 2nd September 1918 and is buried at Peronne Communal Cemetery, Extension.

 

Richard Worthington was born on the Island of Guernsey in 1882, the son of Richard and Lucy. By 1891 the family were living at 30 Park Road, Tonbridge. Richard attended Tonbridge School from 1895 until 1900. In 1901 the family were at 21 Manor Grove, Tonbridge. By that date Richard was an undergraduate student at Emmanuel College, Cambridge University. He then taught, firstly at Bradfield College in 1904, then in various places in France, Germany and Belgium between 1905 and 1912. He then emigrated to Canada. He returned to take a commission in the Gloucestershire Regiment, serving as Captain of “D” Company 2nd/5th Battalion at the time of his death. He died on 4th May 1917 from wounds received on 7th April. He is buried at Lower Cam, St Bartholomew’s Churchyard.

 

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